Jake Levy-Pollans

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  • Bring Them into the Room

    Fed up. Angry. Done. By 1990, Erik Peterson had given up on politics. The former peace movement organizer had stopped voting in protest: No one was seriously talking about race or poverty, both parties were pawns of corporate interests, all our leaders supported more militarization.

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  • How He Won

    It’s not easy to win a deeply competitive campaign for the State Assembly at age 24. It’s especially tough when you’re a first time candidate, not originally from the area, going up against the corporate education reform movement, and an opponent funded by people like Michael Bloomberg.

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  • We don't want $889 million

    Have you seen the news? The Koch brothers are planning on spending $889 million in 2016.
     
    If my newsfeed is any indication, progressives are angry, bitter, frustrated. But that’s not how we’re going to win progress. It’s like we say on the back of our t-shirts.
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  • The Wellstone Model of Organizing

    An elder Hmong woman, deeply connected with her community, comes to a GOTV shift in East St. Paul, she’s trained to use a computer for the first time and the most effective ways to turnout voters.

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  • Winning the Second Time Around, Starting with Wellstone

    We’ll skip to the back of the book: after losing her first campaign in 2012 for a state house seat in Northern Idaho by 123 votes, Paulette Jordan ran again in 2014 and won. Sorry to ruin the ending, but it’s the heart of the story that you don’t want to miss.

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  • From Student Council to Wellstone

    Emily ran for student council president, the Wellstone Way.

    She was in 6th grade, frizzy hair, not exactly part of the popular group, but determined to make a difference. So Emily got to work, circulating a newsletter, waking up early to greet all her classmates during the morning bell, talking about her ideas to improve the school. She didn't win, but it was the experience that launched her career.

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  • Taking Back the Ballot

    The consequences aren’t hypothetical. The cost of inaction couldn’t be more real. Voters head to the ballot box and limit who can marry, who has access to health care, whose kids deserve access to good schools.

    It may seem like ballot measures weren’t really around in Paul Wellstone’s day. But the truth is that for decades, conservatives have strategically used ballot initiatives to push their extreme agenda. To make matters worse, progressives have spent over a billion dollars playing defense – and too often, we’ve lost – or protected a status quo that just isn’t good enough. 

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